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July 2012

IN THIS ISSUE

• SAMHSA Responds To Negative Media Portrayal Of Veterans

• New Kid on the Treatment Court Block

• Sequential Intercept Mapping in a Tribal Community: Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Systems to Identify and Divert Tribal Members and Increase Cultural Competency

• Grantee Spotlight: Colorado Jail Diversion and Trauma Recovery – Priority to Veterans site.

COMING SOON!

A Checklist for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices and Programs (EBPs) for Justice-Involved Adults with Behavioral Health Disorders

Common Elements of Juvenile Mental Health Courts

Successfully Engaging Misdemeanor Defendants with Mental Illness in Jail Diversion: The CASES Transitional Case Management Program

UPCOMING EVENTS

Rethinking Court Responses
to Client Behavior: Incentives
and Sanctions Training
August 30 – 31, 2012
Washington, DC
Registration

Alternatives Conference 2012
October 10 – 14, 2012
Portland, Oregon
Registration

CIT International 2012 Conference
August 20 - 22, 2012
Las Vegas, Nevada
Registration

 

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SAMHSA Responds To Negative Media Portrayal Of Veterans

Training

Negative media portrayals of veterans seem to be more common. Recent news headlines such as, “Police get help with vets who are ticking bombs” (USA Today, 1/26/12) and Dr. Phil’s recent show “From Heroes to Monsters” promote negative stereotypes of men and women who serve and are offensive and hurtful. As one veteran blogged on Dr. Phil’s website: “As a Veteran with PTSD, I am very glad that you changed the title of the episode. Whoever came up with the original title should be fired. I understand the intent. However, I was and am deeply offended. We have our demons with which to contend. I have dealt with my own demons for almost 30 years. I have asked myself ‘Am I crazy?’, ‘Am I a sociopath?’, ‘What the hell is wrong with me?’. Do you want to know what is wrong with me? Nothing. I am having a normal reaction to an abnormal situation…” (Note: Dr. Phil’s website renamed the episode “Heroes in Pain.”)

Under the leadership of Wilma Townsend, SAMHSA’s Director of Consumer Affairs; LaVerne Miller, Senior Project Associate, SAMHSA’s GAINS Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Transformation; and Dan Warvi, Peer Representative from the Colorado Jail Diversion and Trauma Recovery – Priority to Veterans (JDTR) site, SAMHSA convened a Media Coverage on Military Veterans Roundtable on June 10—11, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Roundtable attendees included representatives from the JDTR sites, staff from SAMHSA’s GAINS Center, family members of military veterans, veteran advocacy organizations, and advocates. Members of the media were involved in the planning of the event but, due to schedule conflicts, were unable to attend. Nevertheless, media representatives will remain part of the initiative and will review products developed.

The two day agenda focused on reviewing examples of both positive and negative media portrayals, identifying core principles in media portrayal of veterans, and developing an outline for a media tool kit. Further updates on the development of the media tool kit will be available on the SAMHSA’s GAINS Center website at gainscenter.samhsa.gov.

New Kid on the Treatment Court Block

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Treatment courts – also called “problem solving courts” – have been around for decades. The purpose of these courts is to use the power of the criminal court to get at the heart of recurring problems, rather than simply cycle people over and over through the courts and jails. Most everyone has heard of drug courts, veterans courts, domestic violence courts, and mental health courts. The underlying idea is that unless we look at a person’s situation, whether it is a behavioral health problem such as mental illness or substance use, we are not going to interrupt their continued trips through the justice system. Mental health court and drug court research show that they work – they funnel more people into evidence-based treatments, keep people out of jail and prison, and reduce their criminal offending. Even for people who don’t “graduate” from programs, some treatment court experience generally improves their outcomes.

Some juvenile court judges have over the past few years begun to create a special docket for the youth who they see in court who are having behavioral health difficulties, including mental health and substance use, but also truancy and other youth-only problems.

Visit the SAMHSA’s GAINS Center website to access a map of juvenile mental health courts across the country or read more about treatment courts on the PRA website.

Sequential Intercept Mapping in a Tribal Community: Bridging Tribal and Non-Tribal Systems to Identify and Divert Tribal Members and Increase Cultural Competency

As a result of the 2012 SAMHSA’s GAINS Center Sequential Intercept Mapping (SIM) solicitation, the GAINS Center conducted a cross-systems mapping at the Tribal community of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB) in northern Michigan. The SIM workshop brings together key stakeholders from local criminal justice and behavioral health systems in order to create a cross-systems map, and identify points of intervention and criminal justice diversion for persons in behavioral health crisis at the earliest possible point, beginning from their first point of contact in either system. The Sequential Intercept Mapping is based on the Sequential Intercept Model developed by Mark Munetz, M.D. and Patricia A. Griffin, Ph.D.

The LTBB Tribal community requested the SIM Workshop out of recognition that many of the Tribal members who are suffering with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders are becoming involved in criminal justice system. The workshop participants indicated that 80% – 90% of the Tribe’s dual diagnosis clients who are seeking substance abuse and/or mental health services are also involved in the justice system. It was likewise indicated by local law enforcement departments that numerous encounters with Tribal members are related to or involve members with substance use or abuse and/or mental illness. The participants in the workshops included 29 individuals representing multiple stakeholder systems including mental health, substance abuse treatment, human services, advocates, consumers, law enforcement, and the courts. GAINS Center Consultants Patricia A. Griffin, Ph.D. and Travis Parker M.S., L.I.M.H.P., C.P.C, facilitated the workshop sessions. The LTBB SIM Workshop was the first Tribal mapping conducted by the GAINS Center, and it turned out to be a truly unique experience. Mappings in non-tribal communities typically look at the flow of the target population through a single jurisdiction; however, in Tribal communities this is more complex. Tribal members are not only involved in the traditional behavioral health and justice systems, but also the Tribal behavioral health and justice systems. Learn more.

Grantee Spotlight: Colorado Jail Diversion and Trauma Recovery – Priority to Veterans site

The Colorado Jail Diversion and Trauma Recovery grant is coordinated by the Division of Behavioral Health of the Colorado Department of Human Services. The grant supports a veterans treatment court and its veteran peer mentor program in the Fourth Judicial District, and has developed partnerships with treatment courts in the Second Judicial District and the Eighteenth Judicial District. The grant has trained approximately 1,800 behavioral health and justice system practitioners from over twelve Colorado counties in Taking Off the Pack: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Returning Veteran. Learn more about this grantee and the Jail Diversion and Trauma Recovery – Priority to Veterans program on the SAMHSA’s GAINS Center website at gainscenter.samhsa.gov.

SAMHSA's GAINS Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Transformation is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Disclaimer: SAMHSA's GAINS Center for Behavioral Health and Justice Transformation develops and distributes E-News with support from SAMHSA. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of SAMHSA.

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